Sunday, August 5, 2012

FORTY SHADES OF GREEN IRISH








Most traditional Irish Republicans would agree that the movement is currently plagued by numerous splits and infiltration, both among prisoners and activists. In essence the age old British tactic of divide and conquer is working very well for them currently in Ireland. MI5 and MI6 agents having infiltrated not just the prisons but almost all republican activity and have also covered its tracks, with infiltration of human rights groups and all of the Irish media, including alternative media. First they infiltrate and then gain control of key positions within these organizations to control all dissent. This poison has infected almost all areas of Irish public life.

Currently on the British side of the peace process equation, the Historical Enquiries Team (HET), in conjunction with the PSNI , are in the process of framing criminal charges against people who were active as combatants, when the war that was meant to be now ended in British Occupied Ireland, was still raging. Subpoenas served against the Belfast Project archive at Boston College, is an example of this activity but it is not by any means the only one. The political blessing was clearly given by the Tories, who regard PSF and the process generally as 'lefty crap'. They essentially have decided to resume the war and to put people who fought against them previously in the war in prison.

Dissident Unionists with whom Owen Paterson the present Secretary of State, has been working tirelessly for years to co-opt into his Tory party,  now being led by Nigel Dodds and Maurice Morrow are only puppets, being used by the ‘securocrats’ of MI5 and MI6 who work quietly, ceaselessly, behind the scenes directing the current Anti Good Friday Campaign, which in essence, is a de facto abrogation of the peace deal by the British. Along with the sinister elements working quietly behind the scenes  Foster and Morrow, have never supported the peace agreement and do not want it to work as they continue to prevent a sustainable just peace in Ireland to continue instead, with their Protestant State for a Protestant People, i.e permanently British for their mentors.

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To confirm Tory intent to destroy the process, it has become clear within the past year that Paterson, MI5 and the PSNI are rolling out a covert form of Internment without trial in British Occupied Ireland, aside from the obvious ones in the instance of Marian Price and Martin Corey, they are remanding without credible evidence, many political activists, perceived as a threat to the Stormont state. Lengthy waiting times, courts which unquestioningly accept police statements, provided by war motivated British military intelligence and the political policing of the paramilitary PSNI system that detains, charges and remands republicans, with little or no evidence at all. Republican activists are being removed from the street for strictly political reasons for up to three years at a time, effectively bypassing any pretence of the civilised concept of ‘innocent until proven guilty’.or the centuries old protection of the Magna Carta or Habeus Corpus.

What we are witnessing, is the rebirth of  the  same old Orange scum state of fascist round up, or a so-called peace process without due process. This in fact is a process in which all freedom loving citizens who prove inconvenient to a scum state, face life in prison without due process. Sadistic animal killers and hunters of the the Tory horsey set in Irish and British society are now leading these draconian practices. Millionaire Tory fox-hunting aristocrat, Owen Patterson has overseen the kidnap of Marian Price and Martin Cory, both elderly, gravely ill, the innocent victims of political conscience, to orange sectarianism and British bigoted hatred of Irish republicans and equality. While they are currently not mainstream republican, no one has a monopoly on the truth or Irish republicanism and they are both long time members of the Irish Republican Movement, who have given all in the service of the Irish Republic.

On the other hand most seasoned Irish political activists agree, that unity for Irish republicans, is critical to attain victory and self determination for the Irish. To resist the repression of internment, political policing and what is basically still an orange fascist British mentored statelet, republicans must stick together or work together or use some form of symbiosis to suceed.The fact that the current  Stormont state now has to rely on political Internment, betrays the underlying corrupt and backward nature of that setup. Evil may be a word on the flip side of religious sectarianism fostered by the colonial British but it it also spells LIVE backwards and the poison of British infiltration of all things Irish can be compared to a terminal infectious disease in Ireland currently. Republican unity is crucial in the face of this cancer to legitimate political dissent in modern Ireland. If they can do it to Marian Price and Martin Corey they can do it to all of us. Republicans will stand together or fall.
That is much easier said than done below is an article from today's British Bullscutter Coperation. Maybe something can be learned from it, with regard to the forty shades of green working together;





What the Octopus can Teach us about National Security

 Christopher Mims


Mind control moves into battle

Fish disguised as copycat octopus
First there was the octopus that mimicked fish; now researchers say a fish is copying the octopus.
When American soldiers were killed in Iraq by improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, it was the slow, bureaucratic, centralised nature of the Department of Defense that failed them, says Rafe Sagarin, a marine ecologist at the University of Arizona. It was only once soldiers were authorised to make their own decisions – a move known as the Petraeus Doctrine, after the general who invented it – that they could communicate effectively with locals in order to find out in advance where IEDs might be.

Why was a marine ecologist suggesting ways of protecting armed forces? Well, according to Sagarin, the Petraeus doctrine is exactly the sort of thing an octopus would do. Despite its well-organised central nervous system, many of an octopus's reactions are decentralised. Its individual cells make their own decisions for dealing with the immediate situation – enabling, for example, the invertebrate's famously varied camouflage. Switching to this kind of adaptive tactics provided greater protection for soldiers in Iraq.

Sagarin's insights about the relevance of the octopus to matters of national security are captured in his book Learning From the Octopus: How Secrets from Nature Can Help Us Fight Terrorist Attacks, Natural Disasters, and Disease. The book is more than just speculation: he spent years running National Science Foundation-funded workshops that included biologists, ecologists, anthropologists, first responders and national security experts, all of whom were charged with the task of figuring out how to make America's military and security apparatus more adaptable.

The unusual story of how a marine ecologist ended up in Congress, as a science advisor to US Representative Hilda Solis of California's 31st district, and later as an author of a book that's grown to be a cult favourite among national security types, began during the events of 9/11. When the twin towers of the World Trade Center went down, Sagarin was in one of his most beloved habitats – a marine tidepool in Monterrey Bay, California.

"On the day of those attacks, I was feeling very far removed from what was going on at in Washington and New York," says Sagarin. But he'd always had an interest in policy, so he applied for and received a Geological Society of America Congressional Science Fellowship.

That led to an article in Foreign Policy called Adapt or Die, in which he declared: “If the genus Americanus wants to overcome this latest challenge to its existence, it must adapt its defense mechanisms accordingly. What better way to do that than to harness time-tested Darwinian theory to the cause of homeland security?”

Tentacled tactics

The lessons Sagarin ultimately derived from the natural world surprised even him. "I'm a cynic about generalism in biology and ecology, because systems are so complex," he says. "It took us a while to come to the point where we had any rules at all."

The first rule he derived was, as in the case of the octopus's camouflage and the Petraeus Doctrine, the importance of decentralisation. This, he notes, was the opposite of what America was doing in security at the time, for example with the creation of a centralised, Washington DC-based Department of Homeland Security, which was founded expressly to be a clearinghouse for formerly-dispersed decision-making about security.

The second principle Sagarin and his collaborators noticed was the importance of symbiosis. Nearly all organisms depend on at least one or two – and in some cases many – other species. As an example of how this manifests in security, Sagarin cites the Middle East Consortium on Infectious Disease Surveillance (MECIDS), which brings together Israeli and Palestinian doctors in order to track the spread of infectious diseases like the H1N1 influenza virus. Given the intense political differences between the two countries – the organization spans both the Gaza Strip and the West Bank – its as unlikely a collaboration as you'll find, and yet it works because "they're intensely focused on solving this one set of problems, and nothing else," says Sagarin.

Another lesson from the octopus is that adaptability requires redundancy. "We think of redundancy as wasteful and inefficient, but it's everywhere in nature," he notes.

Defensively and offensively, an octopus has no shortage of coping mechanisms – camouflage, powerful arms, intelligence, a sharp beak, symbiotic toxins and a cloud of ink. When escaping, it can squeeze into a tight space, blend in with the background, jet away, and, in the lab at least, grab two halves of a coconut shell and sequester itself inside them.

Unknown unknowns

Just as importantly, Sagarin discovered what it is that organisms don't do. In general, they don't plan, predict or try to be perfect. When Sagarin tells this to the members of strategic planning departments in government agencies, it leads to "a lot of consternation and grinding of teeth," in part because it's so counter-intuitive.

Indeed, if there is a single message that sums up all of Sagarin's work, it's that organisms realized long ago that the world is a much less predictable place than humans would like to believe. What Sagarin calls the "non-normal distribution of truly interesting events," which was explored at length in Nassim Taleb's book The Black Swan, has relevance to how we'll cope with everything from disease outbreaks to climate change.

"We spend a lot of time in planning exercises, making predictive models, and in optimization routines," says Sagarin. "All of which have essentially been selected against in nature, because they're incredibly wasteful when you live in an unpredictable world."

Organisms and humans should plan for things that occur with some frequency; buildings in earthquake-prone areas must be ready for tremors just as surely as mating Horseshoe crabs need to know the phase of the moon. But the biggest dangers are those we've yet to identify, and if nature is any guide, the only way to prepare for them and respond to them effectively is to have an abundance of flexibility and skills which can be combined to meet any challenge.

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